The Colorist Society International is the body that represents the interest of feature film colorists around the world (I'm an elected member) and is our equivalent of the DGA, ASC or ACE... we just have a much sillier acronym in CSI!  Anyway, the powers that be recently released a one page description of what it is that we do and how and when we do it that might shed a little light on the role for those that are interested or should know already.


The Colorist Society International is the body that represents the interest of feature film colorists around the world (I'm an elected member) and is our equivalent of the DGA, ASC or ACE... we just have a much sillier acronym in CSI!  Anyway, the powers that be recently released a one page description of what it is that we do and how and when we do it that might shed a little light on the role for those that are interested or should know already.


Over the years I’ve periodically dipped my toe into the waters of discussing the “business” of filmmaking; a topic I am, so far at least, fairly lousy at (at least from the perspective of profit).



Color grading in the film and video worlds has always been a heavily technical occupation. It always will be, because a major part of your responsibility is ensuring that your project meets the precise standards of broadcast and distribution companies.


At NAB in April 2016 Jim Wicks and Kevin Shaw publicly announced the launch of the Colorist Society International as the first organization to represent professional colorists as a unified voice for the film and digital entertainment industry.



Colorimetry is sure to be the most complicated parameter to implement being made up of many interrelated issues, if it is adopted for Ultra HD.